Monday, June 10, 2013

The Gods of the North

The Gods of the North

Day School with David Beard MA, FSA

       Saturday, 13th July 2013

Although Anglo-Saxon England was at least nominally Christian from the 8th century, five of the English names of the days of the week refer to early Germanic pagan gods.  Even the two most important Christian festivals, Easter and Christmas, took over the pagan festivals associated with the goddess “Ēostre” and the festival of “geōl” (yule) respectively.

Christian monuments such as the Gosforth Cross and several of the cross slabs from the Isle of Man depict scenes from pagan mythology, and place-names such as Easebourne, Wansdyke and Wayland’s Smithy testify to the knowledge of old beliefs well into the Christian period.

Burial archaeology can provide clues to the nature of early religions, although interpretation is often difficult, and recent archaeological work has demonstrated the influence of Saami religion in some areas of Viking Scandinavia.

This Day School will use the evidence from archaeology, medieval art and literature, and place-name studies to examine the nature of these early Germanic religions.

Click here for further information...

EMAS Field Trip to Sutton Hoo and West Stow

EMAS FIELD TRIP TO SUTTON HOO AND WEST STOW, SUFFOLK

Saturday,           6th July 2013

David Beard will be our guide around two very important Anglo-Saxon sites, though both sites have origins which predate Anglo-Saxon England.

Sutton Hoo, near Woodbridge, comprises a group of burial mounds above the estuary of the River Deben.  Mound 1, which had already revealed the imprint of a ship, was being excavated, on the eve of the Second World War, when the discovery of a ship burial, with artefacts that were of such an outstanding quality, appeared.  These included gold and garnet shoulder clasps, belt fittings, silver objects, helmet, parade shield, sword as well as a garnet and millefori mount for a purse, which had held the Merovingian gold coins that were used to date the burial to C.625AD.  Though the wealthy trappings of a high status individual, perhaps King Raedwald of the East Angles, no body has ever been found, because of the acidity of the soil.

We will have a tour of the Mounds and visit the museum, where the Treasury displays some finds from the burial.  The house, owned by Mrs Pretty, who initiated the 1930’s excavation has also been turned into a display area.

Click here for further details...

Photos from the 2013 EMAS Study Tour to Brittany


Photos from the 2013 EMAS Study Tour to Brittany are now on the web.

You can find them here...

Sunday, June 2, 2013

EMAS PREHISTORIC FIELD TRIP TO THE ENVIRONS OF CRANBORNE CHASE, DORSET

EMAS PREHISTORIC FIELD TRIP TO THE ENVIRONS OF CRANBORNE CHASE, DORSET

Saturday, 22nd June 2013

On his farm at Sixpenny Handley, Martin Green has become involved with one of the most prolific prehistoric landscapes in the country – Cranborne Chase in Dorset. Dorset not only has many types of prehistoric monuments but a Cursus that runs along the Chase for 6 miles.

The wealth of features on his land has meant that prehistoric archaeology has become an absorbing passion for Martin Green, both in connection with excavation and the collection of prehistoric artefacts for his own museum on the farm.

Click here for further details...