Sunday, September 21, 2014

EMAS Field Trip to Coldred, Lyminge, Hythe and Paddlesworth


EMAS Field Trip to Coldred, Lyminge, Hythe and Paddlesworth

Saturday, 1 November 2014

David Beard MA, FSA


Coldred St Pancras Church
 This tiny Saxo-Norman church, just a nave and chancel, stands in an extensive early earthwork north of Watling Street.
Lyminge St Mary's Church The ruins of nave and apse separated by a triple apse alongside the existing parish church are part of the Anglo-Saxon nunnery of St Ethelburg. Excavations in 2012 revealed an Anglo-Saxon royal hall to the north-east of the church.
Hythe One of the Cinque Ports, but now abandoned by the sea. In 1570, Lambarde wrote that the sea had spoilt the harbour and obliterated much of the town. St Leonard's Church has fabric of the 12th and 13th centuries, and is famous for its ossuary.
Paddlesworth St Oswald's Church Although the present church seems to date from early Norman times, indications of an earlier structure were discovered during reparations carried out in 1870. It is not improbable that the original church owed its foundations to St. Ethelburga, the foundress and first abbess, of the neighbouring nunnery of Lyminge, whose name seems to be still preserved in "Tata's Lees" - the hill between Lyminge and Paddlesworth. Bede states that Ethelburga was "otherwise called Tate".